Special Companion Holiday Sale – Thursday, May 26th

Visit our online pharmacy (in affiliation with Dr Lisa Hindle, DVM) at  http://goape.vetsfirstchoice.com/

For your convenience we have a link to our online store on our home page www.GoAPE.Info

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If you need help or would like to place an order give Vets First Choice a call at 888-606-3336 Monday – Friday from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm CST.

*Promos are valid only at our online store (cannot be used at Dr Hindle’s office) and cannot be combined with other coupons or points.  One-time used only.  Promos can be combined with rebates and savings.

This promo ends May31, 2016.

Free standard shipping on most medication orders over $49.  Free shipping on most medications and foods on AutoShip.

There are exceptions, see our shipping policy for more information.

 

 

Hurry-Before These Offers Are Washed Away

Visit our online pharmacy (in affiliation with Dr Lisa Hindle, DVM) at  http://goape.vetsfirstchoice.com/ 

For your convenience we have a link to our online store on our home page www.GoAPE.Info

 

This offer expires tomorrow.

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If you need help or would like to place an order give Vets First Choice a call at 888-606-3336 Monday – Friday from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm CST.

*Promos are valid only at our online store (cannot be used at Dr Hindle’s office) and cannot be combined with other coupons or points.  One-time used only.  Promos can be combined with rebates and savings.

This promo ends May 24, 2016.

Free standard shipping on most medication orders over $49.  Free shipping on most medications and foods on AutoShip.

There are exceptions, see our shipping policy for more information.

Ah-Ah-Ahhhh Choose

Visit our online pharmacy (in affiliation with Dr Lisa Hindle, DVM) at  http://goape.vetsfirstchoice.com/   

For your convenience we have a link to our online store on our home page www.GoAPE.Info

 

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If you need help or would like to place an order give Vets First Choice a call at 888-606-3336 Monday – Friday from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm CST.

*Promos are valid only at our online store (cannot be used at Dr Hindle’s office) and cannot be combined with other coupons or points.  One-time used only.  Promos can be combined with rebates and savings.

This promo ends May 24, 2016.

Free standard shipping on most medication orders over $49.  Free shipping on most medications and foods on AutoShip.

There are exceptions, see our shipping policy for more information.

Small But Scary

Visit our online pharmacy (in affiliation with Dr Lisa Hindle, DVM) at  http://goape.vetsfirstchoice.com/   

For your convenience we have a link to our online store on our home page www.GoAPE.Info

 

This Special Ends Today!

May_Wk12_3-facebook Thursday May 12 ends today

If you need help or would like to place an order give Vets First Choice a call at 888-606-3336 Monday – Friday from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm CST.

*Promos are valid only at our online store (cannot be used at Dr Hindle’s office) and cannot be combined with other coupons or points.  One-time used only.  Promos can be combined with rebates and savings.

This promo ends May 12, 2016.

Free standard shipping on most medication orders over $49.  Free shipping on most medications and foods on AutoShip.

There are exceptions, see our shipping policy for more information.

Bugs Suck, Literally

Visit our online pharmacy (in affiliation with Dr Lisa Hindle, DVM) at  http://goape.vetsfirstchoice.com/   

For your convenience we have a link to our online store on our home page www.GoAPE.Info

 

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If you need help or would like to place an order give Vets First Choice a call at 888-606-3336 Monday – Friday from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm CST.

*Promos are valid only at our online store (cannot be used at Dr Hindle’s office) and cannot be combined with other coupons or points.  One-time used only.  Promos can be combined with rebates and savings.

This promo ends May 12, 2016.

Free standard shipping on most medication orders over $49.  Free shipping on most medications and foods on AutoShip.

There are exceptions, see our shipping policy for more information.

Online Store Specials for May 2 – May 12, 2016

Visit our online pharmacy (in affiliation with Dr Lisa Hindle, DVM) at  http://goape.vetsfirstchoice.com/   For your convenience we have a link to our online store on our home page www.GoAPE.Info

May_Wk12_1-facebook

If you need help or would like to place an order give Vets First Choice a call at 888-606-3336 Monday – Friday from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm CST.

*Promos are valid only at our online store (cannot be used at Dr Hindle’s office) and cannot be combines with other coupons or points.  One-time used only.  Promos can be combined with rebates and savings.

This promo ends May 12, 2016.

Free standard shipping on most medication orders over $49.  Free shipping on most medications and foods on AutoShip.

There are exceptions, see our shipping policy for more information.

Check Out Our New Online Pharmacy

Enjoy this $10 OFF coupon at our online store! View this offer in your browser.
Viewing this on your phone? Call 1-888-606-3336 to place your order.
A Message From Animal Protection and Education
Free Shipping on all orders over $49*
 Dog  |  Cat  |  Flea & Tick  |  Medications  |  Sales 
Welcome to our online store!
Thank you for trusting us to care for your pets. We’re pleased to offer you an easy way to order pet care products – our online store.

To help you get started we have included a courtesy client coupon for $10 off your first order with coupon code: WELCOME6 which expires 30 days from today.

$10 off orders over $75!
Additionally, all orders over $49 ship for FREE.*

Your team at Animal Protection and Education.

Browse Products - Free shippng with Autoship
If you need help or would like to place an order please give us a call: (888) 606-3336 Mon-Fri 9-6 EST. You can also Chat Live with a representative!
Coupons are valid only at our online store  (cannot be used at Dr Hindle’s office) and cannot be combined with other coupons or points. However, coupons can be used with rebates and instant savings. Each coupon requires a minimum purchase amount and can be used one time. Coupon expires 30 days from today.

*Free Standard Shipping on most medication orders over $49. Free Shipping on most medications and foods on AutoShip. There are exceptions, see our shipping policy for more information.

This email was sent to you from: Animal Protection and Education. In affiliation with Dr. Lisa Hindle Paton, IA 50217, (515)460-7729.

 

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Clinic Dates for May 2016

Remaining April 2016 Dates:

April 15th, Rockwell City, (Spay and Neuter Clinic for Small Dogs & Cats) ***AM Vaccination appointments have been added for this clinic!!

April 20th, Winterset, (Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs & Cats)

April 25th, Dallas Center, (Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs & Cats)

April 27th, Newton (Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs & Cats)

 

May 2016 Dates:

Saturday May 7th, Emmet County, (Shelter Animals Only!)

Friday May 13th, Jewell, (Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs & Cats)

Saturday May 14th, Wholesome Pet Essentials, (adoption/microchips)

Wednesday May 18th, Newton, (Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs & Cats)

Friday May 20th, Rockwell City, (Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs & Cats)

Saturday May 21st, Ankeny Vaccine clinic, at Tractor Supply

Monday May 23rd, Jefferson, (Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs & Cats)

 

Saturday June 4th, Redfield, (vaccinations in the am, and Spay & Neuter Clinic after 12pm noon)

FIV in Cats: Frequently Asked Questions

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What is FIV?  FIV stands for Feline Immunodeficiency Virus, and it causes a weakening of a cat’s immune system.  It is a kitty version of HIV in humans.

What are the symptoms of FIV?  Sometimes, there are no symptoms at all.  FIV is a retrovirus that can incubate inside the body for months and sometimes even years, and it’s a very slow-moving virus.  When there are symptoms, they can be all over the map – there is no one symptom that definitively points to FIV.  A cat can show signs of illness interspersed with periods of health.  However, you should always take your cat to the vet when it shows symptoms like enlarged lymph nodes, weight loss, or diarrhea.

How will the vet know if my cat has FIV?  The only way to know is by doing a blood test.  A cat can test positive from 2-4 weeks after exposure, but it can sometimes take longer.  Kittens can test positive after having received the antibodies from their mother’s milk, so it’s always a good idea to retest the kitten later on, since it takes up to six months for those antibodies to go away.  (Actually, it’s always a good idea to retest a cat that tested positive – around 60% of FIV tests are false positives!)

How is FIV transmitted?  The most common way is through a bite wound from an FIV-positive cat to another cat.  It can also be transmitted through blood, in utero, and through a mother’s milk.

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Can a cat with FIV live with other cats?  Absolutely, as long as the cats get along and do not fight.  FIV is not spread through bowl-sharing, litter-box-sharing, or other casual forms of contact – only through blood/bite wounds.  Some cat owners choose to keep their FIV-positive cat in a separate room/floor from their other cats, which seems to work well for them.

Can I get FIV from a cat?  No, absolute not!

What is the treatment for FIV?  There is no specific treatment for the virus itself.  The secondary diseases that come about as a result of FIV, however, can usually be treated.

How can I keep my cat from getting FIV?  First and foremost, keep your cat in the house; this ensures that he cannot get into a fight with an FIV-positive cat.  Recently adopted cats should always be tested for FIV before being brought into the house.  Always spay and neuter your cats – this reduces the likelihood of fighting.  There is a vaccine for FIV, but it is rather controversial – you’ll want to consult your vet about it first.

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I have an FIV-positive cat – how can I keep him healthy?  Be sure to regularly monitor your cat for any changes or symptoms, and bring him to the vet if you notice anything out of the ordinary.  Always keep him inside to prevent him from spreading the virus to other cats; this will also protect him from things outdoors that could bring on infection or disease.  It is also very important to keep your regular vet visits – at least twice a year – to make sure your kitty stays healthy.

Will my FIV-positive cat have a short lifespan?  Not necessarily!  If you keep him indoors and visit the vet regularly, FIV-positive cats can live relatively normal, healthy lives.  The secondary diseases your cat may pick up as a result of the virus can almost always be treated.

There is an adorable FIV-positive kitty up for adoption at my local shelter.  Should I adopt it, or are the risks too great?  If you have another cat at home, you will first need to make sure that neither one will fight with the other, or that you have a separate room for the new kitty to live in.  Otherwise, go for it!  FIV-positive cats often lead very healthy and comfortable lives, so there is no reason to forgo adopting one just because of the virus.

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While A.P.E. doesn’t currently have any FIV-positive kitties up for adoption (we have one in foster care who needs to be socialized before being adopted), we do have lots of gorgeous cats available, from baby to senior, and in all sorts of beautiful colors!  This includes Hudson, whose photo is above!  Check them out here!

Sources:  Best Friends Animal Society, PetMD, ASPCA

 

5 Reasons to Consider Rescuing a Senior Pet

(This piece was originally posted in November 2014 on my blog, Second Chances.  It has been updated and modified for A.P.E.)

One of the most heartbreaking things to see is a senior dog or cat sitting behind bars in a shelter.  And it happens so often.  I am ashamed to admit that sometimes I scroll fast past a photo of an elderly dog with the caption reading “To be destroyed”, because the sadness of it all can be overwhelming.  There are, after all, so many homeless senior animals, and so few of those who can appreciate how wonderful old pets are.

Many people mistakenly believe that older pets must have done something wrong to end up in a shelter – they must have had some “naughty” behaviors for their owners to surrender them.  This is not true!  Many times, senior dogs and cats end up in shelters because their owners have passed away or become ill; other times, owners move into assisted living or cannot financially care for their pet anymore.  In most cases, senior animals are in shelters through no fault of their own.  I have met many senior pets within the past few years, and each has been more sweet and loving than the last.  Here’s why you should consider adding an older dog or cat to your family.

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A painting of my husband’s grandpa’s late dog, Lucy…Wasn’t she beautiful?

Fewer surprises – One of the top reasons for people returning a dog to a shelter is because they adopted the dog when it was a puppy and “didn’t realize how big he was going to get.”  Another reason is not doing enough research into the breed; for example, Australian Shepherd or Border Collie puppies will get adopted then returned because the family hadn’t realized how much energy they’d have.  When you adopt a senior dog, what you see is basically what you get:  for the most part, their personalities are already formed, and their size isn’t going to change.  The same can be true with cats – kittens love to playfully claw and bite, and some owners may not realize that before adopting a young cat.

Less training – In general, adoptable senior dogs and cats are fairly well-trained.  When I worked in a shelter, it was the older dogs who kept the cleanest kennels and seemed to be the most reliable in terms of “holding it.”  Besides some training to work on his barking, my 8-year-old Riley came to us fully house-broken and even knew a few tricks when we adopted him.  Seniors are also calmer than puppies or kittens (at least most of the time!), so chances are, they’re easier to train.  In shelters, people tend to gravitate towards the adorable puppies and kitties, but older pets don’t come with the crazy energy and tendency to chew, bite, or claw that young ones have!

Low maintenance and great for families – Sure, a senior dog would love to go for a walk with you…but he’s just as content curled up on your lap on the couch.  And an older kitty is more than happy to bat around a toy for a while…but what she really loves is to take naps with you!  Though senior pets often still have energy to play, they are starting to slow down and enjoy living the lazy life – so if you’re short on time to play or lead a busy family life, an older animal might be good for your lifestyle.  Older pets also tend to be more independent and don’t need constant attention like puppies and kittens do – this is ideal for families with young children who do constant attention. (Keep in mind that although older pets might need less exercise, that doesn’t mean they don’t need any!  Get out the leash or laser pointer at least once a day so that your senior dog or cat can still get the exercise they need.)

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They’re adorable! – Let’s face it, dogs and cats only get cuter with age.  Nothing is sweeter than a furry face with a greying muzzle, and I think society (or at least social media) is starting to embrace that.  Sites like Buzzfeed are constantly sharing photos or stories about senior pets, and often the Instagram pets that get the most “likes” are older animals.  Even better, organizations like Susie’s Senior Dogs are popping up everywhere, aiming to find perfect homes for senior adoptables.

Save a life – Senior dogs and cats are often the first ones to be euthanized if a shelter is short on space.  They are constantly looked over in favor of those who are younger, healthier, cuter, etc.  Saving a dog or cat that is getting up there in years feels good, and it’s highly rewarding.  The bond you and your pet will form after you have saved his life is an amazing thing, and he’ll be devoted to you for the rest of his days.

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This beautiful girl is Cosmo, a super-sweet senior currently available for adoption through A.P.E.  Cosmo adores children, and she loves nothing more than a good cuddle!  She is a bit overweight – more of her to love! – and will need to stay on diet food once she is adopted.  If you’re interested in this gorgeous senior gal, contact us or fill out an adoption application.  Remember:  Adopting a senior pet is seriously rewarding!

What do you love about senior pets?  Share in the comments! :)